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Friday
Jul212017

Have the fries with that gluten-free, paleo, D.TOX-approved hot dog

If you missed National Hot Dog Day on July 19th, you can also celebrate it today. Phew! But if you're gluten-free, paleo or on a detox, your food choices can sometimes feel limited when a meal includes a bun.

Try this healthy version of the traditional hot dog meal. Use a chicken sausage instead of the typical hot dog, a sweet potato for the bun and bake up slices of rutabaga for your fries. Have you ever tried rutabaga fries? I was a little suspect but amazed at how satisfying and tasty they were.

And Instead of feeling left out of the celebration (or guilty about your indulgence), you can nerd-out about your veggie intake. You'll get up to three servings of veggies and a super dose of beta carotene and vitamin C.

Servings: 1
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 40 minutes

Ingredients
  • 1 small sweet potato  
  • 1 chicken sausage (I used Applegate)
  • 1 small rutabaga
  • Salt and herbs to taste​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
  • Mustard to taste

Method

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  • Cut sweet potato lengthwise, but only halfway
  • Cut rutabaga into "fries," place in bowl and coat with coconut oil
  • Place rutabaga fries on a baking sheet
  • Wrap sweet potato in foil, place in the oven and bake for 30–40 minutes
  • After sweet potato has been baking for 20 minutes, place fries and sausage in oven and bake for 10 minutes (sausage will need less time, about 6–7).
Nutrition Facts 
Sweet potato dog: Calories: 192  Sugar: 5  Fat: 6  Carbs: 26 Fiber: Protein: 8     
Rutabaga fries: Calories: 191  Sugar: 9  Fat: 13  Carbs: 17 Fiber: Protein: 2    
 
Life Time Weight Loss Staff 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader. 

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