LifeTime WeightLoss Logo


« 4 Ways Household Cleaners Negatively Impact Your Waistline | Main | The Ins & Outs of Food Sensitivity Testing »
Wednesday
Mar222017

Carrot Cake Cookies

You know the old saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” Times are changing people, because I think it is the carrot that really takes the cake. Pun intended. I eat carrots every single day—mostly because they can help normalize healthy gut bacteria and even balance hormones. The addition of carrots to these cookies not only provides valuable added nutrition, but incredible moisture and sweetness as well. With 5 grams of satiating protein and nearly 30% of your recommended daily allowance for vitamin A, you can’t go wrong with these sweet little treats. Perfectly portioned and just lightly sweet, these are perfect for that mid-afternoon slump.

Yields 12 cookies

Ingredients:

Cookies:

  • 2 Cups almond flour/meal
  • ½ Cup unsweetened shredded coconut
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ Cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1 banana, mashed
  • ¾ Cup shredded carrots
  • 1 tsp almond extract

 

Frosting:

  • ¼ Cup + 2 Tbsp dairy free cream cheese + ¼ Cup unsweetened almond milk + 5 drops vanilla stevia 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Combine dry ingredients in a medium bowl (almond flour through sea salt).
  2. Combine wet ingredients (egg through almond extract) and add slowly to dry. Roll into 12 balls, flattening slightly with the bottom of a glass.
  3. Bake for 12 minutes. Allow to cool.
  4. While cooling, combine frosting ingredients. When cookies are cooled, frost each cookie with 1 Tbsp frosting mixture.

Nutrition:

Per Serving (1 cookie):  Calories: 180 | Carbohydrates: 9 grams | Fat: 18 grams | Protein: 5 grams 

 

In health, Hanna Grinaker, Life Time - Corporate Registered Dietitian

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version