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Friday
Jul032009

The Buzz on Greek-Style Yogurt

Written by Tom Nikkola - Director of Nutrition & Weight Management

Greek-style yogurt might be one of the products at the grocery store gaining popularity the fastest. While Greek-style yogurt is not new, it is becoming much more popular in the United States.

Greek-style yogurt is thicker and creamier than regular yogurt. This is because some of the whey, which is the more watery part of yogurt, is removed through straining, leaving more of the milk solids. As the whey is removed, some of the lactose is removed as well. What's left is a yogurt with twice the protein of regular yogurt. Full-fat Greek-style yogurt is very much full-fat. It can be as high as 23 grams of fat per serving. As long as you are not adding a lot of extra sugars to it, don't let that dissuade you from using the higher-fat version. You'll likely feel far more satisfied than when opting for low-fat versions.  

Another bonus for Greek-Style yogurt is that it is usually 100% natural. It can be used in place of sour cream, dips or mayonnaise in recipes. The yogurt usually comes in a plain flavor. Fruit-flavors often have fruit with added sugar, so it's use the plain yogurt and add your own fresh fruit, coconut flakes of cacao nibs for some extra flavor or crunch. Just don't be misled by the high-sugar fruit-flavored options. While there are a variety of yogurt brands, the most popular seems to be Fage (pronounced FAH-YEH). If you have a hard time getting enough protein in with breakfast, Greek-style yogurt might be just the answer.

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Reader Comments (3)

Why do you suggest skipping the full fat version of the Greek yogurt when in just about every other article you have posted in the last few months you have said that fat isn't bad? In fact there have been several articles written about that entire subject including Fat won't make you fat, Saturated Fat is given a bad rap, the recent Gary Taubes book review (which he boldly and clearly states SEVERAL times that fat isnt bad) and of course the couple month old article talking about Fat Myths. Why write all these great articles about how we have been lied to about fat, and how it's really not harmful at all (with exception to hydrogenated oils of course) and then make this comment about the "full fat" yogurt being too much fat?
I don't get it??? What kind of message is Lifetime trying to send to it's members?
It's bad enough that you can only get skim milk and soy milk in the cafe, which are hardly healthy choices,where's the whole organic whole milk or coconut/almond milk? Not trying to nit-pick but let's keep preaching a consistent message... Please.
I send alot of people to this blog and these Articles and I trust and believe in everything that you are preaching, please let it be consistent though, you are far ahead of the nutritional curve with this great information, please continue to be the best!
Thanks you are all awesome keep up the good work!

July 4, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterSmr

Smr - thanks for catching that! I've updated the article, which was a couple years old. I'm glad you're recommending the articles and appreciate your feedback. On a personal note, the full-fat Fage yogurt mixed with a little liquid stevia and cacao nibs is one of my favorite snacks.

July 5, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterTom Nikkola

Awesome thanks, i am glad that I wasn't missing something. I was worried there was something I was missing in all if this. Have a great day and I look forward to reading more of your great articles! :)

July 5, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterSmr

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